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Playlist: 29-30 min Specials

Compiled By: Emma Geddes

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Community Wealth Building: From Cleveland to Preston

From Laura Flanders | Part of the The Laura Flanders Show series | 28:00

How does an economy emerge from recession? In Preston, England, they’re experimenting with investing public money in locally-owned businesses and cooperatives, and encouraging local “anchor” institutions to buy from, or train, local vendors. They’re calling it the Preston model of community wealth building, and it’s inspired by a model in another formerly industrialized city: Cleveland, Ohio, home of the Evergreen Cooperatives. This week on The Laura Flanders Show, we take a look at a transatlantic experiment in cooperative community wealth building.

2021-05_new_podcast_slug_buffalo_small How does an economy emerge from recession? Historically, cities hard hit by deindustrialization have strived to attract big employers from elsewhere by offering incentives and tax breaks. But outside employers rarely invest in a place long term, and all too often skip town when the incentives run out. In some places, local governments have been experimenting with other strategies. In Preston, England, they’re experimenting with investing public money in locally-owned businesses and cooperatives, and encouraging local “anchor” institutions to buy from, or train, local vendors. They’re calling it the Preston model of community wealth building, and it’s inspired by a model in another formerly industrialized city: Cleveland, Ohio, home of the Evergreen Cooperatives.  This week on The Laura Flanders Show, we take a look at a transatlantic experiment in cooperative community wealth building.

A Public Health Approach to Policing: The Newark Model

From Laura Flanders | Part of the The Laura Flanders Show series | 28:00

What does it look like to adopt a public health approach to safety, policing, and economic development? In February, 2020, Laura visited Newark, New Jersey, to look at one city where decades of police reform efforts failed to stop violence and crime. Now, at the invitation of Mayor Raz Baraka, Aqeela Sherrills, a former gang-truce broker in Los Angeles, heads up the Newark Community Street Team which leverages residents relationships to prevent violence before it starts. This episode offers a timely glimpse of what it looks like when more responsibility for public safety is put in public hands and opens up the conversation about defunding the police.

2021-05_new_podcast_slug_buffalo_small In the face of on-going police brutality against African Americans and the disproportionate impact of the Covid-19 epidemic on people of color, the United States has reached a tipping point in relation to racism, policing and public health. But what does it look like to adopt a public health approach to safety, policing, and economic development? In February, 2020, Laura visited Newark, New Jersey, to look at one city where decades of police reform efforts failed to stop violence and crime. Now, at the invitation of Mayor Raz Baraka, Aqeela Sherrills, a former gang-truce broker in Los Angeles, heads up the Newark Community Street Team which leverages residents relationships to prevent violence before it starts. Flanders talks with Sherrills and other former gang members turned peace-keepers about how they address abuse and transform trauma for themselves and others, and to the citys Public Safety Director about what its taken to build the teams partnership with police. This episode offers a timely glimpse of what it looks like when more responsibility for public safety is put in public hands and opens up the conversation about defunding the police. 

Life Stages: Death

From New Hampshire Public Radio | Part of the Civics 101 series | 29:07

Or How I Stopped Grieving and Learned to Love Bureaucracy

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It's also the final episode of our Life Stages series, and its euphemism-free. We speak to a doctors, lawyers, professors, and funeral professionals about the rules of death; pronouncing, declaring, burying, cremating, willing, trusting, canceling, donating.

Featuring the voices of Dan Cassino, Ken Iserson, Leah Plunkett, Mandy Stafford, and Taelor Johnson. 

The Untold Story of an Artist Surviving During COVID with Heidi Jeub

From KVSC | Part of the Untold Stories of Central Minnesota series | 29:54

In today’s Untold Story of Central Minnesota, Arts & Cultural Heritage Producer Jeff Carmack takes a look at the life of an artist during the time of COVID-19.

Heidi Jeub is an artist and teacher who relied upon a variety of freelance work to make a living and whose entire world was flipped upside down due to the pandemic. We start with an interview from the beginning of April when we were all just beginning to realize the gravity of the situation and then end out in Holdingford on the Wobegon Trial at a new artistic, community endeavor which is just about to open to the public called Art in Motion where Heidi has found a role as artistic consultant.

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In today’s Untold Story of Central Minnesota, Arts & Cultural Heritage Producer Jeff Carmack takes a look at the life of an artist during the time of COVID-19. 

Heidi Jeub is an artist and teacher who relied upon a variety of freelance work to make a living and whose entire world was flipped upside down due to the pandemic.  We start with an interview from the beginning of April when we were all just beginning to realize the gravity of the situation and then end out in Holdingford on the Wobegon Trial at a new artistic, community endeavor which is just about to open to the public called Art in Motion where Heidi has found a role as artistic consultant. 

The Untold Story of the Public Sharing Their Stories on Juneteenth at St. Cloud's Promise Neighborhood

From KVSC | Part of the Untold Stories of Central Minnesota series | 30:00

In a this Juneteenth edition of the Untold Stories of Central Minnesota, Arts & Cultural Heritage Producer Jeff Carmack attended the June 19th observance of Juneteenth at Promise Neighborhood in St. Cloud.

With the original celebration canceled due to COVID concerns, Promise Neighborhood decided to hold a socially distanced public forum following the recent unrest due to protests over the killing of George Floyd spilling over into the St. Cloud area. Community members were asked to try to come up with answers to two questions, what does St. Cloud need for unity and what is a thing we can DO in St. Cloud to make that happen.

This program is funded in part by the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Legacy Grant!

Promise_juneteenth_2020-1-scaled_small In a this Juneteenth edition of the Untold Stories of Central Minnesota, Arts & Cultural Heritage Producer Jeff Carmack attended the June 19th observance of Juneteenth at Promise Neighborhood in St. Cloud. 

With the original celebration canceled due to COVID concerns, Promise Neighborhood decided to hold a socially distanced public forum following the recent unrest due to protests over the killing of George Floyd spilling over into the St. Cloud area.  Community members were asked to try to come up with answers to two questions, what does St. Cloud need for unity and what is a thing we can DO in St. Cloud to make that happen. 

This program is funded in part by the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Legacy Grant!

The Witches' Hammer

From Hold That Thought | 29:33

How magic and law shaped the witch trials of early modern Europe

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In 1487, when witch trials were just starting to take root in Europe, a Dominican priest published the Malleus Maleficarum , or The Witches' Hammer , a treatise on the prosecution of witches in a court of law. This text would be used over the next three centuries as the authority on the trial and torture of witches, laying out why women in particular were so susceptible to witchcraft. By the end of the witch craze in the 1720s, an estimated 80,000 had been tried and executed. In this extended episode from Hold That Thought , Gerhild Williams, a professor of comparative literature, breaks down the witch trial phenomenon into three parts: (1) defining the witch and the roots of these beliefs, (2) how the political landscape evolved and the contents of The Witches' Hammer , and (3) how and why the witch craze took hold and what we can learn from it today.

Mutual Aid Justice: Beyond Survival

From Laura Flanders | Part of the The Laura Flanders Show series | 28:00

What does it look like in the Justice sphere? If you don’t want to call the cops, what else can you do? Many people turn to transformative justice for help. In the nation that incarcerates more people than any other on earth, there are many reasons why a person might not want to call 911. Undocumented, sick, over-policed, dependent on or in love with an abuser? In this episode, Laura talks with the editors of the just-released book, Beyond Survival: Strategies and Stories from the Transformative Justice Movement. Transformative justice applies the principles of mutual aid to justice. It seeks to resolve violence for the long term at the peer-to-peer, grassroots level by looking for resolution, not punishment, and relying on community, not the system.

2021-05_new_podcast_slug_buffalo_small What does it look like in the Justice sphere? If you don’t want to call the cops, what else can you do? Many people turn to transformative justice for help. In the nation that incarcerates more people than any other on earth, there are many reasons why a person might not want to call 911. Undocumented, sick, over-policed, dependent on or in love with an abuser? In this episode, Laura talks with the editors of the just-released book, Beyond Survival: Strategies and Stories from the Transformative Justice Movement. Transformative justice applies the principles of mutual aid to justice. It seeks to resolve violence for the long term at the peer-to-peer, grassroots level by looking for resolution, not punishment, and relying on community, not the system. Music in the Middle: New Yorkers at home applauding essential workers from their windows.  It’s a daily ritual at 7pm to show appreciation while staying at a distance. And that appreciation is growing louder by the day! 

Washington Post Fact Checker Glenn Kessler on Accountability Journalism

From Gina Baleria | Part of the News In Context series | 29:30

In this episode, we talk with Glenn Kessler, editor… and chief writer of the Washington Post Fact Checker… and credited with doing the first official fact check during the 1996 Presidential campaign… ahead of a debate between Bill Clinton and Bob Dole.

Kessler is also co-author of the book… Donald Trump and His Assault on Truth: The President’s Falsehoods, Misleading Claims and Flat-Out Lies… which chronicles and examines the falsehoods Trump has uttered throughout his presidency.

Kessler’s approach to fact checking had to change during the years Trump was president… prompting him and his team to create a separate database to catalogue and deal with the average of 15 false claims a day… while still endeavoring to explore and contextualize fact checks from other politicians based on policy.

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In this episode, we talk with Glenn Kessler, editor… and chief writer of the Washington Post Fact Checker… and credited with doing the first official fact check during the 1996 Presidential campaign… ahead of a debate between Bill Clinton and Bob Dole.

 

Kessler is also co-author of the book… Donald Trump and His Assault on Truth: The President’s Falsehoods, Misleading Claims and Flat-Out Lieswhich chronicles and examines the falsehoods Trump has uttered throughout his presidency.

 

Kessler’s approach to fact checking had to change during the years Trump was president… prompting him and his team to create a separate database to catalogue and deal with the average of 15 false claims a day… while still endeavoring to explore and contextualize fact checks from other politicians based on policy.

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Sylvia Brownrigg – "Absent Tangible Memory"

From Barry Vogel | Part of the Radio Curious series | 29:00

Metaphysical Touch

When someone dies, we have that person’s papers and things to look at and use to understand and create memories about the life that has left us. Sometimes, however, the person stays and the papers and tokens are lost, as in a fire. Then we have only memories without material objects to help enhance them. This juxtaposition is one of the themes in a novel entitled the “Metaphysical Touch,” by Syvia Brownrigg, an American author with roots in Mendocino County, a long experience in London, and currently living near San Francisco.

Sylvia Brownrigg recommends “Out of Sheer Rage,” by Jeff Dyer.

Originally Broadcast: January 12, 2000

Radio-curious-logosmall_small Metaphysical Touch When someone dies, we have that person’s papers and things to look at and use to understand and create memories about the life that has left us. Sometimes, however, the person stays and the papers and tokens are lost, as in a fire. Then we have only memories without material objects to help enhance them. This juxtaposition is one of the themes in a novel entitled the “Metaphysical Touch,” by Syvia Brownrigg, an American author with roots in Mendocino County, a long experience in London, and currently living near San Francisco. Sylvia Brownrigg recommends “Out of Sheer Rage,” by Jeff Dyer. Originally Broadcast: January 12, 2000

Joe Brewer: Farms of the Future

From Alex Wise | Part of the Sea Change Radio series | 29:00

For environmentalists “agriculture” can be something of a dirty word, associated with other words such as, pesticides, water consumption, pollutants, and deforestation. Not all environmentalists have these negative associations, though. Some, like my guest today, are working to re-fashion agricultural practices so that they actually help to reverse environmental damage. This week on Sea Change Radio we are speaking with Joe Brewer, an American ex-pat living and working in the regenerative agriculture space in Colombia. We discuss his family’s journey to this small but vibrant farming community, the lessons he’s learned, and how those lessons can be scaled to bigger farms in the U.S.

Joe-brewer_copy_small For environmentalists “agriculture” can be something of a dirty word, associated with other words such as, pesticides, water consumption, pollutants, and deforestation. Not all environmentalists have these negative associations, though. Some, like my guest today, are working to re-fashion agricultural practices so that they actually help to reverse environmental damage. This week on Sea Change Radio we are speaking with Joe Brewer, an American ex-pat living and working in the regenerative agriculture space in Colombia. We discuss his family’s journey to this small but vibrant farming community, the lessons he’s learned, and how those lessons can be scaled to bigger farms in the U.S.

What Do You Need to Make Martian Oxygen? MOXIE!

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

Making oxygen from the Martian atmosphere will be essential if humans are ever to visit and work on the Red Planet, and the MOXIE experiment will soon show us how.

Honor, Hope and Healing Monday Special - Part One

From John Floridis | Part of the Montana Public Radio Special Programs - Related to Musician's Spotlight series | 29:01

An hour long celebration of musicians who left us in 2020 as part of our Honor, Hope and Healing Week. The musicians we'll be remembering include.... Bill Withers, Kenny Rogers, Justin Townes Earle, Betty Wright, Peter Green, Jerry Jeff Walker, Lyle Mays, Ellis Marsalis, Johnny Nash, Charlie Daniels, Neil Peart (Rush), Toots Hibbert, Spencer Davis, Helen Reddy, Barbara Martin (The Supremes), John Prine, Joseph Shabalala (Ladysmith Black Mumbazo), Little Richard, McCoy Tyner and Eddie Van Halen. Part one of two.

Honor-hope-healing-fb_small An hour long celebration of musicians who left us in 2020 as part of our Honor, Hope and Healing Week. The musicians we'll be remembering include.... Bill Withers, Kenny Rogers, Justin Townes Earle, Betty Wright, Peter Green, Jerry Jeff Walker, Lyle Mays, Ellis Marsalis, Johnny Nash, Charlie Daniels, Neil Peart (Rush), Toots Hibbert, Spencer Davis, Helen Reddy, Barbara Martin (The Supremes), John Prine, Joseph Shabalala (Ladysmith Black Mumbazo), Little Richard, McCoy Tyner and Eddie Van Halen. Part one of two.

Honor, Hope and Healing Monday Special - Part Two

From John Floridis | Part of the Montana Public Radio Special Programs - Related to Musician's Spotlight series | 29:30

An hour long celebration of musicians who left us in 2020 as part of our Honor, Hope and Healing Week. The musicians we'll be remembering include.... Bill Withers, Kenny Rogers, Justin Townes Earle, Betty Wright, Peter Green, Jerry Jeff Walker, Lyle Mays, Ellis Marsalis, Johnny Nash, Charlie Daniels, Neil Peart (Rush), Toots Hibbert, Spencer Davis, Helen Reddy, Barbara Martin (The Supremes), John Prine, Joseph Shabalala (Ladysmith Black Mumbazo), Little Richard, McCoy Tyner and Eddie Van Halen. Part two of two.

Honor-hope-healing-fb_small An hour long celebration of musicians who left us in 2020 as part of our Honor, Hope and Healing Week. The musicians we'll be remembering include.... Bill Withers, Kenny Rogers, Justin Townes Earle, Betty Wright, Peter Green, Jerry Jeff Walker, Lyle Mays, Ellis Marsalis, Johnny Nash, Charlie Daniels, Neil Peart (Rush), Toots Hibbert, Spencer Davis, Helen Reddy, Barbara Martin (The Supremes), John Prine, Joseph Shabalala (Ladysmith Black Mumbazo), Little Richard, McCoy Tyner and Eddie Van Halen. Part two of two.

Children & Toxins

From Guy Rathbun | Part of the IdeaSphere: A Platform for Today's Voices series | 29:00

Thousands of new chemicals have been developed and released into the global environment during the last four decades. Yet, most of those chemicals have undergone only minimal safety testing. Which means their potential for developmental toxicity is not known for years.

Dr Those who are most negatively affected by the lack of oversight are the children. The impact is felt for their lifetime.

Now, there is a comprehensive guide to the environmental threats. It’s authored by two of the foremost researchers in the field of pediatrics and environmental health, Mary M. Landrigan and Dr. Philip Landrigan.

Children & Environmental Toxins: What Everyone Needs to Know is the title.

Dr. Landrigan is a pediatrician, epidemiologist. He serves as Dean for Global Health in the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.   He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine, and now on the End Kids Cancer advisory board.

In the early 1970s, Landrigan’s attention was drawn to the exposure of lead and its affects on children. His landmark studies were among the first to show that lead can cause brain damage to children. This work was critical in persuading the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to remove lead from gasoline and paint. Their actions  resulted in a 95% decline in lead poisoning in children.

Landrigan joins the program along with Executive Director of End Kids Cancer, Frank Kalman, who’s daughter was diagnosed with neuroblastoma nearly 20-years ago. It sent him on a path to better understand childhood cancers, and therefore help other parents faced with tough choices.

I should also note that I am on the board of directors for End Kids Cancer.

Re-Localizing Food

From Wendy Ring | Part of the Cool Solutions series | 28:00

Food hubs in Charlottesville VA and Warrenton VA support local farmers and provide fresh produce for their communities. When COVID broke long supply chains, local food hubs stepped in and grew stronger.

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We can't change farming without creating alternatives to the global monopoly supply chains which turn farmers into quasi- sharecroppers. That's where food hubs come in.

The founders of 2 Virginia food hubs, the Local Food Hub in Charlottesville and 4P Foods in Warrenton, talk about their experiences and the importance of building local markets for a just and sustainable food system.

Not simply for foodies with disposable income, food hubs are key partners in community efforts to get healthy food to those in need. Creative programs like the Local Food Hub's Fresh Farmacy and 4P's pop up farmers market at a ball field concession stand are reaching people who experience multiple barriers to obtaining fresh produce.

When industrial agriculture's long supply chains failed in March 2020, local food hubs were able to pivot quickly, keeping farmers afloat and communities fed.

Storytellers:

Kristin Suoco, The Local Food Hub

Tom McDougall, 4P Foods

Jim Goodman, National Family Farm Coalition

Sally Worley, Practical Farmers of Iowa 
Jim Goodman, Sally Worley, Kristen Suoco, Tom McDougall 

Ramon Torres, President of Familias Unidas por la Justicia, Jason Holland, WPEA Organizer, and Edgar Franks, C2C Organizer

From KSVR Studios: Skagit Valley Radio | Part of the We Do the Work series | 28:01

Interview by Gary Kanter: Ramon, Jason, and Edgar tell the story of how a group of farm workers ended up negotiating a great union contract.

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Ramon Torres, President of Familias Unidas por la Justicia, Jason Holland, WPEA Organizer, and Edgar Franks, C2C Organizer

Interview by Gary Kanter: Ramon, Jason, and Edgar tell the story of how a group of farm workers ended up negotiating a great union contract.

For more information, go to http://familiasunidasjusticia.org/en/home/, https://www.facebook.com/FamiliasUnidas/, or http://www.foodjustice.org/team/.

We Do The Work Comment:
We need our voting rights guaranteed.

World in Progress 12/10/2020

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the World in Progress: Global Development Issues ~ from DW series | 30:00

This week on the show: The dark side of St. Nicholas -

The Christian tradition of Saint Nicholas usually means it's time for small gifts and chocolate, especially for kids. But for others, the tradition has a dark side: The Netherlands' Zwarte Piet or Black Pete depicts a helper of Saint Nicholas dressed in blackface. And: Chocolate isn't so sweet for West African chocolate producers.

Wip1_small This week on the show: The dark side of St. Nicholas - The Christian tradition of Saint Nicholas usually means it's time for small gifts and chocolate, especially for kids. But for others, the tradition has a dark side: The Netherlands' Zwarte Piet or Black Pete depicts a helper of Saint Nicholas dressed in blackface. And: Chocolate isn't so sweet for West African chocolate producers.

Aftershocks of Disaster: Puerto Rico Before and After the Storm

From Making Contact | Part of the Making Contact series | 29:00

Three years after Hurricane Maria hit, Puerto Ricans are still reeling from its effects and aftereffects. We bring you a Haymarket Books talk by Marisol LeBrón, Yarimar Bonilla, and Molly Crabapple, on a collection of essays called “Aftershocks of Disaster: Puerto Rico Before and After the Storm” which discusses the legacy of Maria, and also community organizing in the face of government abandonment. This piece includes clips from the Short Film : "Aftershocks of Disaster," directed by Juan C. Dávila, and produced by Yarimar Bonilla.

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Three years after Hurricane Maria hit, Puerto Ricans are still reeling from its effects and aftereffects. We bring you a Haymarket Books talk by Marisol LeBrón, Yarimar Bonilla, and Molly Crabapple, on a collection of essays called “Aftershocks of Disaster: Puerto Rico Before and After the Storm” which discusses the legacy of Maria, and also community organizing in the face of government abandonment. This event includes the premier of the new short film: "Aftershocks of Disaster," directed by Juan C. Dávila, and produced by Yarimar Bonilla.

The concept of "aftershocks" is used in the context of earthquakes to describe the jolts felt after the initial quake, but no disaster is a singular event. Aftershocks of Disaster examines the lasting effects of hurricane Maria, not just the effects of the wind or the rain, but delving into the failure of the state and the incredible organizing done by everyday people in order to rebuild and support one another.

Amazon Awakenings

From BirdNote | Part of the Sound Escapes Season Two series | 29:30

Discover the tranquility of Zabalo Wilderness Quiet Park in Ecuador and learn why Gordon describes it as "a living Eden."

Zabalo_16-9_small Discover the tranquility of Zabalo Wilderness Quiet Park in Ecuador and learn why Gordon describes it as "a living Eden."

Sleepyhead: The Neuroscience of a Good Night’s Rest

From Guy Rathbun | Part of the IdeaSphere: A Platform for Today's Voices series | 29:00

Sleep. It’s one of the most mysterious things about life. No one fully understands why we sleep. Yet, we make things even more confusing when we consider sleep disorders.

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Science writer Henry Nicholls examines his own experience to understand the peculiar world of sleep disorders. There’s the old cliché, “write about what you know.” And Nicholls does just that with his book Sleepyhead: The Neuroscience of a Good Night’s Rest.

His challenge is narcolepsy. As he argues, it is the ideal springboard from which to survey the neuroscience behind sleep disorders.

Henry Nicholls is a science writer with four books: Lonesome George, The Way of the Panda, Galapagos, and now Sleepyhead.

How Artistic Gifts Help Inspire and Motivate Good Health

From Ampers | Part of the Minnesota Native News Special Edition: COVID-19 Community Conversations series | 28:30

How Artistic Gifts Help Inspire and Motivate Good Health
Host Leah Lemm explores how Indian Country in MN is responding and adapting to the current pandemic health crisis.

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Today on the show, Leah looks at how our artistic gifts can be motivation to prioritize health, to get healthy, to stay healthy. Last week we discussed how a cancer diagnosis and treatment can be complicated during the pandemic. And this week, our guest shares how to live life even more fully after facing the illness, and we begin a continued conversation about health and artistry.
Robert DesJarlait is a Red Lake citizen, a celebrated artist, and a cancer survivor. Leah is joined by MN Native News reporter Melissa Townsend, who spoke to Robert DesJarlait. 

Robert is also a Tiwahe Foundation grant recipient who is making art inspired by resilience in response to COVID-19, and Tiwahe will share the work of grant recipients on their website and through social media. 
We also include a message from Herb Fineday, artist and owner of Round Lake Traditions, who created a video with the American Indian Community Housing Organization (AICHO) in Duluth and their project to engage Native communities with COVID 19 info that’s culturally relevant, weaving teachings and values throughout. https://www.aicho.org/

Tribal Sovereignty and the Health of Native Communities

From Ampers | Part of the Minnesota Native News Special Edition: COVID-19 Community Conversations series | 28:30

In this show, Leah welcomes Lyz Jaakola, an Anishinaabe mother, teacher, and musician living on her home Rez, Fond du Lac in Cloquet, MN. They reflect on the relationship between the federal government and tribes –and how it affects the health and economic well-being of tribal communities during the pandemic.

Reporter Melissa Townsend talks with U.S. Senator Tina Smith about her recent speech on the floor of the Senate, where she urged Congress and the President to make good on treaty and trust responsibilities to Native America, specifically about money allocated by the CARES Act, which has been slow in reaching tribes. Minnesota Senator Tina Smith (D) is a member of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee.

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Host Leah Lemm explores how Indian Country in MN is responding and adapting to the current pandemic health crisis.

In this show, Leah welcomes Lyz Jaakola, an Anishinaabe mother, teacher, and musician living on her home Rez, Fond du Lac in Cloquet, MN.  They reflect on the relationship between the federal government and tribes –and how it affects the health and economic well-being of tribal communities during the pandemic. 

Reporter Melissa Townsend talks with U.S. Senator Tina Smith about her recent speech on the floor of the Senate, where she urged Congress and the President to make good on treaty and trust responsibilities to Native America, specifically about money allocated by the CARES Act, which has been slow in reaching tribes.  Minnesota Senator Tina Smith (D) is a member of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee.

Lyz Jaakola shares her perspectives on how COVID-19 and highlights long-held misunderstandings around tribal sovereignty and treaty promises, which can directly impact the health and well-being of community members. 

Curating The 19th Amendment from the National Endowment for the Arts

From National Endowment for the Arts | Part of the Art Works Podcast series | 30:00

The National Endowment for the Arts discusses the exhibit Votes for Women: A Visual History from Suffrage to Civil Rights with its curator Amanda Burdan

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Many women won a political victory 100 years ago with the passage of the 19th amendment which declares that the right of citizens to vote "shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.".   The Brandywine Museum of  Art  is commemorating its passage and the long struggle leading to it with the exhibit Votes for Women: A Visual History funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts. Votes for Women shines a spotlight on the movement with over 200 hundred objects including drawings, illustrations as well as historic photographs of marches and rallies and examples of clothing and sashes worn by the suffragists.  Significantly, Votes for Women works against what had been a dominant narrative: that the suffrage movement had been mainly white. It recognizes both the critical efforts of women of color and their community networks and the inability of the 19th to guarantee access to the ballot to women of color—primarily but not exclusively in the Jim Crow south. A companion exhibition Witness to History ”continues the story of the ongoing struggles marginalized communities faced when voting following the passing of the Nineteenth Amendment”  featuring 55 photographs taken during the historic 1965 civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery.   Curator Amanda Burdan talks about creating an inclusive exhibit about suffrage, its challenges and rewards, as well as the determination, political sophistication and publicity savvy of the suffragists.

Disability Justice, Disability Arts

From Laura Flanders | Part of the The Laura Flanders Show series | 28:00

Two Artists in their conversations with Laura, wheelchair dancer Alice Sheppard and TourettesHero Jess Thom, expand our ideas about beauty, mobility and inclusion. They question the role of art in society as well as our attitudes towards disability and what is typically considered “normal”.

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Laura Flanders interviews two performance artists whose work illustrates how difference and neurodiversity make art and society richer and much more interesting. Alice Sheppard is a wheelchair dancer and esteemed choreographer, the artistic director of the company Kinetic Light. Jess Thom is a performer and comedian with Tourettes Syndrome, the founder of the project TourettesHero. In their conversations with Laura, they question the role of art in society as well as our attitudes towards disability and what is typically considered “normal”.

Design for Justice: Disabled Hackers are Leading the Way

From Laura Flanders | Part of the The Laura Flanders Show series | 28:00

Can technology advance society if it doesn't include all of society? This week, we talk with three disability justice activists who have ideas about how tech can ensure design, technology, and art are accessible and equitable. Not just ideas, they're doing it, and they are sparking a movement.

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Can technology advance society if it doesn't include all of society? This week, we talk with three disability justice activists who have ideas about how tech can ensure design, technology, and art are accessible and equitable. Not just ideas, they're doing it, and they are sparking a movement.

with guests Laurel Lawson,  Chancey Fleet, Vilissa Thompson 

Music by Bosq of the album ‘Love and Resistance’ released on Ubiquity Records

 

The National Endowment for the Arts presents Art Works

From National Endowment for the Arts | Part of the Art Works Podcast series | 27:29

Visual Artist and Disability Rights Advocate Gordon Sasaki talks about the art of visibility.

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Last December, the Office of Accessibility held a webinar in which three successful artists discussed how they navigated their careers working with a disability. To no one’s surprise, one of the invited artists was Gordon Sasaki. For nearly 40 years, visual artist Gordon Sasaki has been working to increase accessibility to the arts for both practitioners and audiences. Believing in the fundamental power of art to advance disability rights, many of his paintings, sculptures and photographs reflect the body and how it is represented, the reality of living with a disability, and the diversity of disabilities, both obvious and subtle. Today’s podcast celebrates  the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act with an interview with Gordon Sasaki about his work, navigating the art world and the streets of New York, the changes the ADA has brought to his life, the work left to be done and his service dog Maki.

Autism advancements in Education and Research with Dr Marlene Sotelo from the Els for Autism Foundation and Dr. Melissa Hale University of Miami SPARK research

From Ken Grey | Part of the Maximum Health Radio "Quality Living" with Dr Ken Grey Holistic Physician series | 27:22

Autism advancements in Education and Research with Dr Marlene Sotelo the director of programs and operations for the Els for Autism Foundation and Melissa Nannette Hale Ph.D Department of Psychology, Associate Director, University of Miami SPARK Research Center for Autism and Related disabilities

Img_0096_small Autism advancements in Education and Research with Dr Marlene Sotelo the director of programs and operations for the Els for Autism Foundation and Melissa Nannette Hale Ph.D Department of Psychology, Associate Director, University of Miami SPARK Research Center for Autism and Related disabilities

"Annie Barnes – Racism in America"

From Barry Vogel | Part of the Radio Curious series | 29:00

Everyday Racism: A Book For All Americans

Racism has too long been a part of the American experience. The Civil War and the Constitutional amendments that followed, the Supreme Court decisions ordering the desegregation of schools, and the Civil Rights movements did not end racism in America. Annie S. Barnes, holds a Ph.D. in Social Anthropology from the University of Virginia and is a retired Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at Norfolk State University in Virginia. She is the author of “Everyday Racism, A Book for All Americans,” a book based on the racist experiences suffered by 146 black college students. Professor Barnes describes effects of racism on black people and what black people and white people can do to combat it.

Annie Barnes recommends “Driving While Black,” by Kenneth Meeks.

Originally Broadcast: February 27, 2001

Radio-curious-logosmall_small Everyday Racism: A Book For All Americans Racism has too long been a part of the American experience. The Civil War and the Constitutional amendments that followed, the Supreme Court decisions ordering the desegregation of schools, and the Civil Rights movements did not end racism in America. Annie S. Barnes, holds a Ph.D. in Social Anthropology from the University of Virginia and is a retired Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at Norfolk State University in Virginia. She is the author of “Everyday Racism, A Book for All Americans,” a book based on the racist experiences suffered by 146 black college students. Professor Barnes describes effects of racism on black people and what black people and white people can do to combat it. Annie Barnes recommends “Driving While Black,” by Kenneth Meeks. Originally Broadcast: February 27, 2001

A conversation with poet Sally Wen Mao

From National Endowment for the Arts | Part of the Art Works Podcast series | 28:52

Sally Wen Mao’s poetry excavates the burden of spectacle for Asian-Americans.

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Sally Wen Mao’s second collection of poetry Oculus has gotten a great deal of well-deserved attention. The word Oculus comes from the Latin; it means “eye.”  It can also refer to the lens of a camera, and architecturally, it’s a circular window or a circular opening at the top of a dome.  In her poetry, Sally Wen Mao uses these multiplicities of meanings as she examines the violence of spectacle. In Oculus, Mao presents the many ways in which Chinese people, most particularly women, have become spectacles for American audiences-- in life, in death, on film and on line — objectified by a lens they don’t control.  Her poems excavate this history of spectacle beginning with Afong Moy the first Chinese woman to come to America and displayed to paying audiences as an oriental curio. In a series of persona poems starring Anna May Wong, Mao travels through time from silent films to the present day.  Mao also interrogates the culpability of current technology from an online suicide in 2014 to a murder that was a front page sensation and horror in 2012. Through them all, Sally Wen Mao makes clear the price these people paid and continue to pay as they hold the weight of our gaze, their visages a spectacle for others to consume, both visible and unknown. And the poet also intervenes—reanimating and resurrecting these women who have been flattened by history’s gaps and the narrowness of our stares.  Earlier this week, Sally Wen Mao spoke with me about Oculus, her attempt to create poetry that can speak through historical silences, the fluid line between image and spectacle, and the weight of representation.

LIVING IN AN AMERICAN INTERNMENT CAMP

From Michelle Harven | Part of the Legacy series | 29:03

Mary Tamaki Murakami talks about life in an internment camp during World War II and why she sees parallels in today’s treatment of Muslim-Americans.

Mary_15_small Mary Tamaki Murakami was still swooning over pop stars and worrying about her homework when her life suddenly took a very real turn. Immediately after the Pearl Harbor attack on December 7, 1941, she experienced a crackdown in her own San Francisco neighborhood. She was forced into an internment camp with her family, and experienced the type of descrimination that was enforced by the Supreme Court. Today, she shares her experience with schools and organizations because she fears history is already repeating. As more parallels emerge between her own experience and new policies affecting Muslim-Americans, Mary hopes her story can serve as a warning.

"The People" - Definition of Resilience

From Native Voice One | Part of the Definition of Resilience series | 29:00

Visiting the local hip-hop community in Oklahoma and the Suquamish reservation in Washington, Quese IMC and Calina Lawrence show us what happens when we come together as a People.

Definitionofresilience_smaller_small Definition of Resilience is a four episode radio and video documentary series highlighting the dynamic stories of Native American hip-hop MCs. INDIGEFI host Alexis Sallee travels to document their contribution to modern music. Each episode follows two artists who share their story and Indigenous history. Through interviews, we hear personal stories from addiction and identity to boarding schools and generational trauma. We see these artists powerful lyrical and artistic expression work to uplift their communities and inspire youth. From Minnesota to Alaska, eight rappers bring insight and emotional rawness in exploring disconnection and reconnection to Native culture. 

Season 4 Episode #8: This Asian American Life- Searching

From Mable Chan | 23:15

When was the last time you had a talk, or a fight with your father?

What might trigger your urge to call him, or to reflect on what’s been missing in your relationship?

In Part 1 of my interview with Mimi Wong, a New York based writer and multimedia producer shared her story, first published in “How Watching Asian Father on Screen Helped me Face My Own.”

The movie “Searching.” prompted her to dive into deep personal thoughts about her father, Asian fatherhood and media portrayal of Asian masculinity.

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When was the last time you had a talk, or a fight with your father? 

What might trigger your urge to call him, or to reflect on what’s been missing in your relationship?

In Part 1 of my interview with Mimi Wong, a New York based writer and multimedia producer shared her story, first published in  “How Watching Asian Father on Screen Helped me Face My Own.” 

The movie “Searching.” prompted her to dive into deep personal thoughts about her father, Asian fatherhood and media portrayal of Asian masculinity. 

Music used:
One in a Billion Theme Song by Brad McCarthy
Hlice by Monplasir
Inspirational Outlook by Scott Holmes
Little Tomcat by Josh Woodward

We want to include you in this conversation.

To send us your comments or stories, just go to our Facebook page or our website at OneinABillionVoices.org under “Pitch a Story.”

Share your thoughts? Pitch me a story?

“One in a Billion” is listening to #China, one person at a time.Subscribe to “One in a Billion” below: PRx | iTunes | SoundCloud

 

 

Season 4 Episode #12: This Asian American Life- Don’t Call Me Crazy

From Mable Chan | 29:07

What drives you crazy?

How about being called just that - crazy.

If you are struggling with a mental disorder, you might lash out or turn inward. And when you do, that word “crazy” could feel like a weapon that cuts through your skin.

In this episode “This Asian American Life: Don’t Call Me Crazy” - New York based writer/editor/illustrator Hannah Bae reads a chapter she’s contributed to a new book “Don’t Call Me Crazy” that depicts her personal struggle dealing with her mother.

Her experience is one of thirty three dynamic and intimate voices in this fascinating book about mental health and a guide with helpful resources.

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What drives you crazy? 

How about being called just that - crazy.

If you are struggling with a mental disorder, you might lash out or turn inward. And when you do, that word “crazy” could feel like a weapon that cuts through your skin. 

In this episode “This Asian American Life: Don’t Call Me Crazy” - New York based writer/editor/illustrator Hannah Bae reads a chapter she’s contributed to a new book “Don’t Call Me Crazy”  that depicts her personal struggle dealing with her mother. 

Her experience is one of thirty three dynamic and intimate voices in this fascinating book about mental health and a guide with helpful resources. 

Music used:
One in a Billion Theme Song by Brad McCarthy
Bathed in Fine Dust by Andy G. Cohen
Highride by Blue Dot Sessions
The Gloaming by Josh Woodward
Which That is This by Doctor Turtle
Undercover Vampire Policeman by Chris Zabriskie

We want to include you in this conversation.

To send us your comments or stories, just go to our Facebook page or our website at OneinABillionVoices.org under “Pitch a Story.”

Share your thoughts? Pitch me a story?

“One in a Billion” is listening to #China, one person at a time. Subscribe to “One in a Billion” below: PRx | iTunes | SoundCloud

Sidekicks: Tonto and Kato

From Eric Molinsky | Part of the Imaginary Worlds series | 29:12

There wasn’t anything authentic about Tonto and Kato, but that didn’t matter to the audiences who enjoyed their team-ups with The Lone Ranger and The Green Hornet. But embodying those sidekicks was a lot more challenging for the actors Jay Silverheels and Bruce Lee, who struggled to find humanity within the stereotypes, and respect behind the scenes.

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In part two of our mini series on sidekicks, we look at two characters that have travelled in parallel since they came out of the same radio station in the 1930s – Tonto and Kato. There wasn’t anything authentically Native American or Asian about these sidekicks, but that didn’t matter to the audiences who enjoyed their team-ups with The Lone Ranger and The Green Hornet. Embodying Tonto and Kato was a lot more challenging for the actors Jay Silverheels and Bruce Lee, who struggled to find humanity within the stereotypes and respect behind the scenes. Featuring Dustin Tahmahkera of the University of Illinois, Chadwick Allen of the University of Washington, Daryl Maeda of the University of Colorado at Boulder, Zig Misiak author of “Tonto: The Man in Front of the Mask”, and Matthew Polly author of “Bruce Lee: A Life.”

BEAT LATINO: Ancestral AND cutting edge: Aboriginal and indigenous tunes!

From Catalina Maria Johnson | 58:00

This week’s Beat Latino takes traditional music way, way back and way into the future all at the same time! It’s an hour dedicated to ​the new aboriginal and indigenous-rooted music from all over the Americas, North and South, and all sung in original languages such as Quechua, Tzotzil and more! Take a wondrous paseo through ancestral music for the 21st Century!

Beatlatino-aboriginal-2_small This week’s Beat Latino takes traditional music way, way back and way into the future all at the same time! It’s an hour dedicated to the new aboriginal and indigenous-rooted music from all over the Americas, North and South, and all sung in original languages such as Quechua, Tzotzil and more! Take a wondrous paseo through ancestral music for the 21st Century!

Indigenous Women Telling a New Story of Energy

From Native Voice One | 28:59

A half-hour documentary special featuring Winona LaDuke that presents a new energy story told by Indigenous women; one that protects our land and its people.The women seek to carry forth the wisdom from their ancestors and combine it with the intelligence available to us today.

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NV1 is pleased to present a half-hour documentary special, "Indigenous Women Telling a New Story or Energy" featuring Winona LaDuke.

 

Indigenous women have a new story to tell for our energy future.

The current story being told by our energy policies, practices and industry are devastating the land and changing climate. This program is an engaging and entertaining call to action for a new energy story that protects our land and its people.  

If we need a new story for energy, we likely need new storytellers. Energy stories told by Indigenous women seek to carry forth the wisdom from their ancestors and combine it with the intelligence available to us today.

 

Good News

From Brooklyn Public Library | Part of the "Borrowed" Podcast from Brooklyn Public Library series | 25:16

It’s been a rough year. So, we gathered all the good news we could find to brighten your podcast feed. Hear kids read to a therapy dog, a library love story, babies learning ASL, and adults age 90 and older learning to use Zoom.

2450_cp_podcast_release_small_small It’s been a rough year. So, we gathered all the good news we could find to brighten your podcast feed. Hear kids read to a therapy dog, a library love story, babies learning ASL, and adults age 90 and older learning to use Zoom.

Rekindling from Burnout

From Brooklyn Public Library | Part of the "Borrowed" Podcast from Brooklyn Public Library series | 25:09

Burnout from work is something a lot of us are thinking about right now. It's been on the minds of librarians, too. We talk to a group of library workers who got together to combat the stress of the profession, and support each other.

Borrowedpodcast_small Burnout from work is something a lot of us are thinking about right now. It's been on the minds of librarians, too. We talk to a group of library workers who got together to combat the stress of the profession, and support each other.

Education For All

From Brooklyn Public Library | Part of the "Borrowed" Podcast from Brooklyn Public Library series | 28:40

Ingrid Douglas never finished high school as a teenager. When she started looking for a better job at age sixty, she found not having a degree was a huge barrier. So, Ingrid came to the library to get her diploma. In this episode, we talk to students and instructors at BPL about how the library can be a refuge for those who have experienced trauma or adversity on their path to education.

2450_cp_podcast_release_small_small Ingrid Douglas never finished high school as a teenager. When she started looking for a better job at age sixty, she found not having a degree was a huge barrier. So, Ingrid came to the library to get her diploma. In this episode, we talk to students and instructors at BPL about how the library can be a refuge for those who have experienced trauma or adversity on their path to education.

Healing a Country’s Wounds: Transitional Justice

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Half Hour Episodes series | 29:00

This time on Peace Talks Radio, we’ll talk about ways that countries have addressed systematic human rights violations after they emerge from periods of conflict and repression. While there’s no one magic solution, transitional justice is a collection of strategies for creating sustainable approaches and avoiding destructive outcomes when a country has been in extreme conflict. Transitional Justice includes international criminal courts, truth and justice commissions, and reparations.

Sharing

A regularly debated topic in the United States is how to heal our country’s wounds.  Well, how have other countries done it?  And what are options that may work? For example, could rewriting a textbook be a strategy for healing a country’s past wounds?

This time on Peace Talks Radio, we’ll talk about ways that countries have addressed systematic human rights violations after they emerge from periods of conflict and repression. While there’s no one magic solution, transitional justice is a collection of strategies for creating sustainable approaches and avoiding destructive outcomes when a country has been in extreme conflict.

Transitional Justice includes international criminal courts, truth and justice commissions, and reparations.

Suzanne Kryder talks with:  Ruben Carranza, a lawyer with the International Center for Transitional Justice; Sandy White Hawk, a Sicangu Lakota adoptee from the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota and a Commissioner for the Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission; and Nkechi Taifa, a social justice attorney and member of the National African American Reparations Commission.

Europa Clipper Sails Toward Launch

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

Mission system manager Al Cangahuala says the robotic explorer of Jupiter’s ocean moon is making steady progress toward a 2024 launch.

Europa_clipper_journey_to_an_ocean_world_poster_small_small Jupiter’s moon Europa hides a vast water ocean under a protective layer of ice. The Europa Clipper mission will send a powerful orbiter to investigate. Mission system manager L. Alberto (Al) Cangahuala tells us about the great strides made toward a planned 2024 launch and the challenges ahead. Bruce Betts faces one of the greatest challenges for any parent: getting a new college freshman installed in a distant university. Our chief scientist takes a break from the preparation to share the night sky and a new space trivia contest. Hear and discover more at https://www.planetary.org/planetary-radio/al-cangahuala-europa-clipper-update

Heather McGhee: The Sum of Us, What Racism Costs Everyone and How we can Prosper Together (Re-Air)

From Laura Flanders | Part of the The Laura Flanders Show series | 28:00

Color of Change board chair Heather McGhee talks with Laura about her New York Times best-selling book, The Sum of Us, What Racism Costs Everyone and How we can Prosper Together. She shows how inequality saps the economy, hierarchies damage public health, and short term greed wreaks havoc on the ecosystem.

We also take a close look at The American Rescue Plan, which breaks with much of the bipartisan consensus of recent decades and represents a historic step forward for a newly effective coalition of multi-racial forces at work in Washington, says McGhee. How far does it go towards refilling what McGhee calls the “drained pool of public goods,” and what can everyday people do to uproot zero-sum thinking and embed a different set of values in their communities?

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